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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
an account and then wait for the money to come in, i guess. >> she's also using the site to raise money for an ice-skating show she's planning. >> we've seen a lot of teenagers raising money for really interesting projects on fundly. you can raise money for a team, you can raise money for a school, you can raise money for a friend who's in need, you can raise money for medical expenses. >> that's why more and more organizations are using crowdfunding. you can put up links for information and upload photos and video. if you have a good cause, it's a way to reach out far beyond your own community. >> we've seen teenagers say, "you know what? this year for my birthday, don't give me presents. i want to raise money for a cause that i really care about." >> but keep this in mind -- most crowdfunding sites make money by taking a commission on each donation you get. so your first move is to find out just how much their service is going to cost. that's why it's a good idea to get some guidance from a parent or other trusted adult. >> there's still lots ahead, so stay with us. >> we'll be right
'll tell you why one presidential monument includes a statue of his dog. >> so join us now for this week's "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids ns." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. we'll start with our top story. >> whether you've already got your driver's license, a learner's permit, or are still just a passenger, you're probably quite aware that the cost of gasoline has gone up a lot in recent years, and that's causing many people to rethink the cars they drive. carina reports on one answer to the high cost of gas -- electricity. >> the first cars appeared in the late 1700s. they were powered by steam, like locomotives. but soon, these horseless carriages moved to using what's called an internal combustion engine. basically, that means they ran by burning fossil fuel. and ever since, internal combustion engines have run on... >> gas. >> gas? >> gasoline? >> yes, gasoline. or its cousin, diesel fuel. but gas and diesel pollute. so carmakers tried electricity. that didn't work so well. one of the problems was the battery. they just couldn't make a battery powerful enough to make an
." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> it used to be a sign of being cool. but america's smoking habits have been changing over the years. emily reports that teens are helping lead the way. >> no, i don't smoke cigarettes. i actually had an aunt. i'd always take her cigarettes and hide them from her. and like, it just -- i was just never a cigarette type. >> i don't smoke cigarettes because i think it's gross and you get lung cancer, and i don't want lung cancer. >> i don't smoke because there's no point to it. it's addictive. it doesn't help you. there's no point. >> the number of american teens who smoke has been going down for years. in fact, we're less likely to use tobacco than the teens in many other countries. surveys show that only about 12% of all 10th graders have smoked recently. but that's still too many. >> nicotine addiction, take one. >> that's why the government puts out messages like this one. >> [ coughs ] boy, that smoke is really obnoxious. do you think that guy knows how bad smoking is for him? >> these pool players know what they're ta
top story. >> a lot of us join walkathons because we have a personal connection to the cause. but as emily reports, one boy's connection is not only personal, it's amazing. >> there's always excitement when an event like this is about to begin. the crowds, the signs, the different groups with their team shirts. >> let's go! [ cheers and applause ] >> this one-mile march is to raise money for the maria fareri children's hospital in new york's westchester county. it's also raising awareness about the need for transplant donors. that's why it's so special that 11-year-old tyler is here. this is not the first walkathon for tyler. the last time he joined this event, he was just hours from undergoing surgery for a new liver. >> i was really sick, you know? so i had to get a liver transplant. >> tyler had been battling a liver disease for years, and it was getting worse. to get a donated liver, you need to be on a national list. for tyler, time was running out. the hospital's medical team worked hard to get him moved to the top of the list. even so, the wait took more than a year. >
, but the underlying cause is a problem with the body's immune system. >> immune system works to protect us from infections, like bacteria or viruses or parasites, but sometimes, it gets confused, and it starts recognizing foods as an enemy, and it starts mounting an immune response. >> that response can range from itching to rashes called hives, vomiting, even difficulty breathing. very severe symptoms are called anaphylaxis. anaphylaxis is not only scary -- it can be deadly, and it can happen in an instant. >> your throat closes. hives all over your body. your eyes puff up. it's different for everybody, really, but it gets really fatal. [ siren wails ] >> every 10 minutes, someone in the u.s. is rushed to the emergency room with a severe allergic reaction. what's more, food allergies are becoming more common. peanut allergies alone have tripled since our parents were kids. >> i have a friend who's allergic to almonds. >> my friends are allergic to nuts, berries, and milk. >> my best friend is allergic to peanuts. >> one of my friends, she's allergic to peanuts. [ mid-tempo piano music playing
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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